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in the middle east and a message to president assad to as turkey authorizes military action inside syria. >> this is not a mandate to wage war. it is so we can't prepare new development and protect our interests there. we are not declaring war on syria. >> mitt romney relaunched -- why the republicans are claiming victory at last night's u.s. presidential debate. >> coat ♪ >> love them, we do. 50 years ago today, the beatles released their first ever single. we look at how it holds up. decker packwood cause >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america to the problem. the turkish prime minister said today he had no intention of starting a war with syria. but the message is mixed and the tensions are high. the turkish parliament authorize military action against neighbor after syrian shells landed in the turkish town killing five civilians. >> lot this was not turkey's war, but the deaths of one family next to the syrian border have changed kuwait this country sees its neighbors conflicts. the government has called the strike from syria a final straw. left of the isn't family hoped. -- th
is deeply hostile to president assad and says that syria must be held to account. they are urging nato allies to help. >> the a very very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease- fire. >> this is exactly what many people feared, the conflict spreading and flaming an already divided region. turkey backed the rebels, lightly armed, but without clear that ship. they have taken ground from a substantial army backed by iran in particular. president assad no longer controls his country, but equally he has not lost it. the longer the syrian deadlock, the greater the risk to its neighbors and the region will get sucked into confrontation. >> you will see this proxy conflict boiling over. you need some kind of international momentum to form a consensus that action can shift the ground away from conflict. >> note and to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television is that this does result of unbearable bombings and a lot of today. -- no end to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television said that this is the resul
becomes, can bashar al-assad handle fighting from in his country the rebels as well as outside of his country from turkey? that could be enough to crush the regime? >>guest: there is is no doubt bashar al-assad wants to keep turkey out of this. that is why we see not just syria apologizing but the russians who are the main diplomatic protector coming in and trying to contain this situation. what you see from the west, also, frankly, is a desire to contain the actual spillover here, the fighting here, and move this into the united nations security council to try to take advantage of this, to spur action in the council. >>trace: you use the word "contain" and that brings the next question. are you concerned this could become a regional war and spread in what really is a very unsettled part of world? >>guest: well, it is already more regionalized than people realize. you have this strike in turkey. it is not the first strike in turkey. we have seen strikes in lebanon. there have been a flow of refugees? jordan and turkey. we have iranian forces and ed in the fighting. as time goes on we
as a popular uprising against the assad dictatorship which has ruled syria 42 years. one of the most experienced war correspondents covering the civil war in syria is our clarissa ward. she's recently returned from aleppo and joins us now at the broadcast center in new york. clarissa, what can you tell us about who might have been behind these bombings today? >> reporter: well, scott, so far no group has actually claimed responsibility for today's attacks, but there is no doubt that there is an increasing number of extremist groups operating on the ground in syria. they're using the same kind of terrorist tactics that we've seen in iraq and afghanistan and part of the reason for that is this influx of foreign fighters that we've seen into the country. our crew actually spent time in a safe house on the border of turkey that was filled with fighters who had come from northern africa, from other countries, and they said they had come to syria to fight jihad. >> pelley: this civil war which began about 18 months ago to overthrow the dictatorship was in those days all about democracy and
. in the syrian capital damascus, aresident bashar al-assad made a cere public appearance, laying a wreath to the mark of anniversary of the 1973 war against israel. sresident assad's regime is fighting for the survival, and it's unlikely that he wants to antagonize a powerful neighbor like turkey. but the bloody chaos that's cost housanf thousands of lives inside syria, now threatens to entangle other countries, even if they don't really want to fight. holly williams, cbs news, istanbul, turkey. gh axelrod: now to afghanistan where two u.s. soldiers were .illed today by insurgents. it happened in the eastern section of the country that's seen heavy fighting in recent months. tomorrow marks the 11th anniversary of the start of the fghan war. coming up, a vatican insider nvicteted. stay with us. >> axelrod: at the vatican the verdict is in-- the pope's butler did it, found guilty of stealing papers from his boss and leaking them to the press. alan pizzey has been following intrigueigue. o reporter: paolo gabriele's record of seven years of alithful service as the papal ogyler and his apolog
's a very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease-fire. >> reporter: parts of the syrian city of lipo laid in rubles. syrian state tv said three suicide bombers detonated cars packed with explosives killing 34 people. three blasts went off within minutes of each other near military officer's club pap fourth struck near the chamber of commerce. the city has become one of the biggest battlegrounds in the 18 month fight between rebels and government forces. syria's parliament condemned the bombings referring to the rebels as terrorists trying to out of president bashir al assad. lipo has seen intense fighting but been rarely the target of suicide attacks. the kploegs triggered panic among some residents who just want the conflict to end. >> it's been three weeks since the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya was attacked. four americans were killed. there are questions and criticism of the u.s. response to the attack. congress is opening its own investigation. at the state department margaret brennan reports secretary clint
assad's tanks and helicopters and fighter jets. >> that takes some talking. the former nato sprum allied commander is supporting the campaign and to the right is kristen silverberg, am bass tor to the union. before today, mitt romney had not specifically called for arming the rebels and this country is really not too keen on it and nor are they too opposed, it seems. if you look at it, 48% favor doing so. 47% oppose doing so, but this is new from mitt romney. but how are we supposed to know who the good guys are, who the bad guys are and is he suggesting for a moment that america send the guns? >> no, what governor romney outline ed today was a plan to work with the region, turkey, the saudis, to make sure they have a weapons they need. the two things we hear, first from the opposition groups themselves, that they don't have the weapons they need to overthrow assad and second from our partners in the region, that they feel constrained by u.s. policy from doing things to support the rebels. and that's really a disaster for us. one because we're allowing a slaughter to continue. 30,000 civ
's a very, very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease- fire. >> reporter: parts of the syrian city lay in rubble following four explosions. syrian state tv says three sue a side bombers -- suicide bombers detonated cars. packed with explosives. they went off within minutes of each other near a military officers club. the city has become one of the biggest battlegrounds in the 18- month fight between rebels and government forces. serious parliament -- syria's parliament condemned the bombs as terrorists trying to oust president assad. the explosions triggered panic among some residents who just want the conflict to end. vinita nair for cbs news. >> president assad reportedly visited ahelp poe on tuesday to get a firsthand look at the fighting. he has ordered 30,000 more troops into that battle. >>> here's a look at some other things making news now at 4:37. teachers in chicago have approved a new three-year contract. it includes pay increases and a new evaluation system. the chicago board of education is expected to
to operate against syria. the turkish government has taken a very strong position against assad and calling for him to leave and accusing him of terrible deeds. so, yes, but it's not in the interest of the syrians to provoke the turks. the turkish army is fairly strong and the syrians are already having trouble fighting the free syrian army why bring in another enemy? >> pelley: hisham melhem, you see it that way to? >> the syrians said they are investigating the accident but obviously we don't know if t exact circumstances. logically one would say assad can't provoke the turks because the turkish army is strong and they can take out the syrian army which is already exhausted. at the same time there are those who would argue that it's in the interest of syria to force the turks to play their hand and even the threat of a regional conflagration could force the international powers, the russians, the iranians, others to push the turks not to help the syrian opposition as we talk now we can talk about a regional conflict albeit on a limited basis. we know iranians are sending technicians, trai
. it's working with the arab league to identify people to help force assad out of power a year after president obama said, we want assad out of power. he has substantive things to talk about on the debate stage when they debate foreign policy in two weeks and that ad is now irrelevant. >> don't you think this is a case of him saying, i'll do the things the president is trying to do but do them more effectively? >> there's a fair case to make and there's an opening for that. >> i agree. i'm not saying that's a bad thing. >> there's an opening the size of a pin drop. he didn't lay out his strategy for peace in israel. on iran, the best he could come up with was, i'm going to get tougher on iran because i'm going to have tougher sanctions. >> when barack obama came to office, he said, i'm not george w. bush, so therefore, i can negotiate with iran. >> he said he would open up all doors but he wasn't going to give you a seat at the table unless you wanted to come and talk peace. >> we have unsolicited advice on the other side of the break including helpful hints for donald trump. stay wi
going from both sides. as president bashar al-assad syrian troops launched another attack on the rebels in the northern part of his country. there is a heavy turkish military presence this. clearly, the artillery has been given the grown light to fired. it is a dangerous dynamic and we could have a regional war. turkey is part of nato, so turkey could invoke the collective defense clause of that treaty and it would draw on the united states and other western allies to recollect and defend turkey if it gets into a war with syria. the other dynamic, the syrian rebels need help. it could be a point that syrian rebels launch shells at turkey to try and start a war that obviously they would get a lost help from going up against the common enemy, president bashar al-assad. >>trace: and the syrian rebel, how are they doing? >>guest: they have not been doing great but this week they did get some good news in an unusual victory. they took over a syrian air defense space which means they got the missiles inside that base, and if they can figure out how to use the missiles against president bashar
with the overall win forethier for this season. >> he was part of syrian president assad's brutal regime and now he's talking to cnn. >> how did assad's behavior change? >> translator: he seemed worried all day long. we rarely saw him smiling. he stared out the windows and was always anxious and tense. >> the tearian press officer give as firsthand account of what is happening inside the government. "homemade" yummy, scrumptious bars. hmm? i just wanted you to eat more fiber. chewy, oatie, gooeyness... and fraudulence. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. [ male announcer ] fiber one. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. if we want to improve our schools... ...what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ...nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. side by s
inside their country to a conflict with turkey. jon: bashar al-assad's forces have enough of a problem just containing, just battling their own population, the rebel fighters within syria. if they have to take on a force from outside, namely turkey, are they going to be able to handle that? >> no, they could not. quite frankly, i don't think they can handle the rebels if we gave them the weapons that they desire and some of the information that they desperately need, not even to speak of a no-fly zone, if we just armed them properly i think the syrian military would have significant problems with the rebels as we've already seen. jon: but then you wind up with the question of who fills the vacuum. if bashar al-assad were to fall who fills the vacuum, and can we be certain that the rebels are going to wind up being our friends? >> well, we cannot. i don't think anybody would be able to predict that, and certainly what we've seen in egypt and also in libya tells you just how challenging this is. we do know what we have there now. we have a brutal dictatorship where people are socially, p
-- village was not targeted. president bashar al-assad is -- for the time being, he is not really -- he does not want to see this. the russians and the chinese would not support such a move. it is not in the syrian interest to act in a very aggressive manner. the turks are very nervous. they have seen border violations on several occasions. let's not forget that back in june, two planes were shot down by the syrians. the turks are very nervous about these developments. >> are you saying that the situation will likely not escalate? >> i do not think the situation will escalate for the time being. neither side is interested in escalation. of course, turkey is using very strong language. that is a matter of national honor, so to speak. but these revenge attacks we have seen carried out by turkey on syrian territory today helps cool down the mood. neither side is really wishing to see a further deterioration of the situation. for this reason, you will see a calming down of the situation. >> do you think what happened in turkey could be used by nato as a pretext for getting involved in the confli
. a burial takes place and nato condemns the assad regime. welcome to gmt. david eades. coming up, with an audience of 50 million to impress, as romney gained ground on obama in the first of the televised presidential debates? >> it is not moral for my generation to keep spending more than we take in, knowing those burdens of will be passed on to the next generation. >> i promised i would fight every single day on behalf of the american people, the middle class, and all those striving to get into the middle class. kept that promise. >> also -- ♪ ♪ you know i love you >> 50 years since the beatles released their first single. it's midday in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington, 2:00 in the afternoon in turkey where the parliament is in an emergency session over a bill of the rise across borders military operations in syria. turkey has already retaliated to the mortar attack that killed five people in a border town. despite international calls for restraint, that military response is still going on. reports that syrian soldiers may have been killed. now this report. >> the
president bashar al assad to step down due to his crackdown on his own citizens. and there have been a number of incidents between the two countries. last june, syrian antiaircraft defenses shot down a turkish military reconnaissance jet, killing two pilots, both sides disagree on where exactly that incident took place. but the turks did not really fire back. they didn't use force aside from condemning that attack. the syrians accused turkey of arming the rebels that are fighting against bashar al assad's regime. so this is a very tense relationship and there are voices here at turkey calling for more significant retaliation in response to the death of these five turkish citizens. >> how do the turks feel, ivan, when it comes to possible military intervention in syria? >> i think there are a lot of misgivings, brooke. there are a lot of voices here that are afraid that turkey could be dragged into a war with syria. opposition, political parties have spoken out against the government's policy of supporting the syrian opposition and supporting the syrian rebels. they actually accused t
transfer the chemical weapons to hezbollah. i think that's a significant red line. if the assad forces were to do that, i think that would precipitate much bigger crisis and draw from the united states. barring that or major attack on turkey, i think we're in a gruesome ugly stalemate. dagen: for how long? >> it could drag on for a year, two years, yes. connell: we mentioned at the top the impact on the presidential election here in the united states would be. you think it will be kind of status quo through november and beyond. >> i think so. again, providing the rebels with things like shoulder fire missiles that could take down the government's helicopter gunships, that would be potentially a game changer, but barring that, if we don't up the supply to the rebels they have enough to stay in the game but not enough to do a big kill on the assad government. dagen: what about the overall picture for oil production in the middle east? i mean you mentioned the outlook for iraq. but are we in this area where you think we'll be at $90 a barrel for months and months, maybe even years? >> you know
, and children have been massacred by the assad regime over the past 20 months. violent extremists are flowing into the fight. our ally turkey has been attacked. the conflict threatens stability in the region. america can take pride in the blows that our military and intelligence professionals have inflicted on al qaeda, pakistan, afghanistan, including the killing of osama bin laden. these are real achievements one at a high cost. al qaeda remains a strong force, however, in yemen and somalia, libya, other parts of north africa, iraq, and now in syria, and other extremists have been ground across the region. drones and modern instruments of war are important tools in our fight, but are no substitute for national security strategy for the middle east. the president is fond of saying that the tide of war is receding. i want to believe him as much as anyone else. but when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region, and with a violent extremists on the march, and with an american amba
partners like russia and iran, who are strong supporters of the assad regime in syria. >> we'll continue to watch it. ivan, thanks. >>> we will obviously continue to follow that. let's check in with isha and the "360" bulletin. >>> nearly month after the deadly attack at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, an fbi investigation team got to the site and spent only a number of hours in the city. for security reasons, they traveled with u.s. military support. four americans were killed in the september 11th attack, including ambassador chris stevens. >>> the outbreak of noncontagious fungal meningitis has grown to 36 cases in nine states. at least five people have died. every patient infected received a steroid injection to the spine, a common treatment for back pain. >>> the most successful college basketball coach of all time says in an affidavit she initially felt forced out at the university of tennessee by the athletic director. the legendary lady vols coach stepped down in april, eight months after being diagnosed with alzheimer's. so she testified in a lawsuit filed by another u.t. employ
trading partners like russia and iran, who are strong supporters of the assad regime in syria. >> we'll continue to watch it. ivan watson. ivan, thanks. >>> we will obviously continue to follow that. let's check in with isha and the "360" bulletin. >>> 18 children are dead after a landslide buried their elementary school in southwest china. the bodies were found in the village. the students wouldn't normally be at school today because of a national holiday, but they were making up classes after a series of earthquakes last month. >>> nearly a month after the >>> an fbi investigation team got to the site and spent only a number of hours in the city. for security reasons, they traveled with u.s. military support. four americans were killed in the september 11th attack, including ambassador chris stevens. >>> the outbreak of noncontagious fungal meningitis has grown to 35 cases in 6 states. that's 9 new cases in one day. at least five people have died. every patient infected received a steroid injection to the spine, a common treatment for back pain. each patient received an injection o
and it is distinctions that give us the complexity we need to understand the world and assad ran a brutal dictatorship but nothing like saddam hussein. i had my passport taken by the iraqi authorities when i was in iraq -- i was very nervous obviously. i only got back to the airport before i left. i was a journalist who got too close to my story and i was intent on eliminating saddam hussein. i believed like the lot of people, different western countries in the world and on both sides of the aisle that there were wm ds and i believe a regime this suffocatingly brutal you couldn't trust. you had to assume that it existed and the work turned out so miserably. had we had different generals and different strategy could have been different. you can't simply say it wouldn't have mattered no matter what we did but on the other hand a lot of the mistakes we made were implicit in the hubris of the conception because we can play counterfact wills all we want but at the end of the day you are stuck with the fact you have and you have to live with them and deal with them. >> you add up the costs. almost 5,000 ame
of assad who has been crushing rebels and killing civilians. and mr. romney said he will link relations with egypt, now led by pot morsi of the muslim brotherhood, what has been described virulent anti-west and says our relationship will be based on trade, something mr. romney said should be much more aggressively policed and pursued, free trade and fairer trade with china. those really the only major distinctions emphasized today and outlined in terms of specifics from mr. romney. shep? >> shep: carl cameron live in virginia. as i mentioned, president obama's team was responding to governor remain knee's speech -- romney's speech before he gave it. after he spoke, a spokeswoman for the president said, this is somebody who leads with chest pounding rhetoric. he is inexperienced and the american people have serious questions about whether he's prepared to be commander in chief. team fox coverage continues. ed envy with the president in california. we're hearing from the president himself, ed. >> that's right. bring it on. that was the simple response from the president's campaign spokesm
of the syrian president bashar assad, turkey flip support to the rebels. and now provides a safehane for fighters. >> -- safe haven for fighter fighters. the wail of ambulances signals more wounded rebels coming from life-saving treatment in turkey. much of the ammunition and weapons use in the rebel street to street combat comes across the same border, flowing in to syria. unverifiable amateur video shows the civil war intensifying. with rebels celebrating capture of syrian army checkpoint and commandeering armored personnel carrier. what the larger battle comes increasing death toll. estimated 200 in the past two days. the international community is reluctant to intervene militarily in the syrian civil war but the artillery exchanges between syria and turkey could easily escalate to a regional war. bringing in nato. but it may not end there. as the syrian regime enjoyed uncontinue support from russia and iran. bret? >> bret: leland vittert in our middle east newsroom. thank you. >>> up next, why is the number 716 billion so importantbe in this presidential race? later, the small b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)